Man Made DIY


00048

Feb 03, 2010

How To: Make a Keychain Screwdriver for Tinkering on the Go

I mean it. At least once a week, I find myself out and about and in the need of a screwdriver. I keep a multitool in my on-the-go bag, but I simply never seem to have it when the need strikes.

I have a key that will fit in most flat-slots, but a good old #2 Phillips head has come to be a must. I looked around, and found these for $10.00, but they're out of stock everywhere, and cost $6.95 to ship, I thought I could come up with a cool DIY solution for much less.

created at: 2010/02/02

I started with the plan to simply attach a driver bit to my keys, but that failed for two reasons: one, there's not much torque available through spinning between my fingers; and two, these things are made of titanium, and after four broken drill bits, I realized there's no way I was going to get through one.

But, eventually, I came up with a solution that works quite well, and isn't much a burden to have… read more

00047

Feb 02, 2010

How To: Mini Lightbulb Terrarium

I love any craft project that involves breaking stuff AND miniature things, so this tiny terrariums housed in a lightbulb are right up my alley.

Alligator

Julie Melton from TinyTerra shares her technique for creating these diminuitive biospheres on The Hipster Home. Apparently, once you're able to remove the filament from the lightbulb, it's pretty smooth sailing from… read more

00046

Feb 02, 2010

How To: Paint a Glow-in-the-Dark Sketch Wall

 

New improvements in special consumer paints have openned up all kinds of opportunities for  projects and home customization.

Chalkboard paint allowed Kate to create a whole new take on tablescapes:

And magnetic paint on the back of this bathroom door turned it into a helpful storage solution:

But, there's a new kind on the special paint block, and it may be the best one yet: Phosphorescent paints that make anything they cover GLOW IN THE DARK!

PaulBo from Fangleelectronics used this amazing stuff to create an art wall, that's eternally reusable...like a giant glow-in-the-dark… read more

00044

Feb 01, 2010

How To: The iSandwich

DO play with your food!

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I do love a how-to that's so unique, it gets its own blog... Oh, and check the materials list:

- A lot of fruits
- Some extra time
- One piece of bread
- A very sharp knife

I hope someone makes an iPhoneread more

00042

Jan 29, 2010

How To: Room Divider Made from Recycled LPs

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Vinyl LPs - records, albums, 12"s, whatever you want to call them - maintain a cult-like following, even in 2010. Audiophiles love to collect and actually play them, hipsters like to pretend they own them, hip-hop producers are still sampling them, and all kinds of artists are paying homage to the analog days of yesteryear.

Me? I like to listen to the good ones, and make stuff from the rest. And luckily, so do Anne and Todd. They made this DIY room divider out of used LPs, which sets two spaces apart while still allowing one to see through, maintaining the airiness the room already has.

They don't provide an exact how-to at… read more

00041

Jan 29, 2010

DIY Atomic Nightstands with Hairpen Legs

http://mid-century-modern.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/P1040437.JPG

Having worked on how-to publication over the last few months (win a copy here), I've been immersed in the world of DIY mid-century products. There's simply not a ton of these projects out there, and for good reason: The entire mid-century modern design movement emmerged from contemporary manufacturing technologies. These pieces are decidedly difficult to make by hand, in that they use factory techniques like bent plywood, fiberglass molding, and the like. which are innaccessible to most weekend warriors.

So, it's always exciting to see achievable mid-century inspired how-to projects. And these very atomic nightstands from… read more

00039

Jan 28, 2010

How To: Properly Use a Semicolon

How to use a semicolon, the most feared punctuation on earth.Remember everyone: A ManMade reader is punctuationally-attuned reader.

Tongue-in-cheek art site TheOatmeal wants to help you know the best times to use a semicolon, "the most feared punctuation on earth."  From connecting independent clauses to super-commas and high-fiving dinosaurs, this is one grammar lesson you'll never… read more

00032

Jan 25, 2010

Five Very Manly, DIY Aftershave Recipes

Bay Rum Aftershave by MaggieMason.

A proper aftershave does three important things post-razor: 1) it contains an antiseptic agent to keep your newly vulnerable skin germ free; 2) It helps soothe the skin and 3) it helps close the pores (openned from the warm water and the blade) to keep out dirt and oil.

And, like all good things - it can be made at home. Here's five options to check out, with lots variation in difficulty, complexity, and, of course, scent.

1. Bay Rum Aftershave - The Art of Manliness recently offered these two recipes for a classic Bay Rum. "West Indies bay leaf, spices, and Jamaican rum, combine to give the bay rum fragrance its… read more

00029

Jan 22, 2010

Ikea Hack: Make Straws from Ice!

If IKEA had an impulse buy section, the Plastis ice tray would be in it. You've seen it, it makes long ice tubes to slip into the not-so-wide mouths of reusable water bottles.

created at: 2010/01/22

read more
00028

Jan 21, 2010

iPhone Inspired DIY Kitchen Touch Screen

created at: 2010/01/21

Ryan and his wife were ready to stop being paper bound in the kitchen, and needed away to let go of recipe cards, printing recipes from the internet, and keeping cookbooks away from sauce splatters. And, being 2010, they turned to accessible digital technology. Their goals - slash - requirements?

  • must be discrete and look like a digital picture frame when not being used.
  • must be touchscreen.
  • must have internet access.
  • must be easy to use and not crash often (she's used to windows vista)
  • must have barcode scanner for managing her kitchen database.
  • the wires and techo stuff must be hidden and out of sight.
  • should be able to view what's on… read more
00023

Jan 18, 2010

Making Marmalade - It's Way Easier than It Looks

Windall and Lenore from Evil Mad Scientist found themselves in a terrible predicament this winter - 75 pounds of free citrus fruit, and no way to eat it all. So, they opted for the route that many take when they find themselves with a plethora of produce - they canned it by makin' marmalade.

Marmalade 15

"The first step is to peel the fruit. We've made lemon, lemon-orange, and orange marmalade, but you can use pretty much any citrus fruit.

We looked around a bit and settled on this recipe primarily because of its simplicity. It scales well. For a large batch, just keep peeling and cutting fruit until the pot is full or your hands were tired. You can also scale down--grab a couple of oranges from the cafeteria and you'll make a lot of friends in your dorm… read more

00022

Jan 15, 2010

Twenty-One Recipes for 2010's Food of the Year: Fried Chicken

2008 was all about pork bellies and cupcakes, and in 2009, thoughts turned to locally roasted coffee, Peruvian food, and a trillion ways to prep brussels sprouts. And in 2010?

Well, apparently, it's fried chicken. At its best, crispy, juicy, and savory, it very well may be the perfect post-recession dish. And, in the right hands, it can be prepared with much more nuance and technique than just eleven herbs and… read more

00021

Jan 14, 2010

How To: Bicycle Gear Clock

Hands down, this is the finest piece of recycled bike part art I've seen. Most just end up looking a bit, well, like hot glued dirty used bike parts, but this clever repurposing of a chain ring actually makes for some surprisingly high design.

Inspired by the Etsy shop 1 by Liz , April from The Hipster Home whipped this up for her mister as a holiday gift. Here's how she did it:

"The first challange was to find a free or inexpensive bicycle chainring. (Ok so the REAL first step was researching and figuring out exactly what the spiky circle  that the chain goes around was called. NOW YOU KNOW TOO.) Since we’ve got a… read more

00017

Jan 11, 2010

How To: Use a Cast Iron Skillet for Super Crispy Homemade Pizza

pizza cooked in a heated cast iron skilletTraditional pizza ovens feature stone or brick floors, which retain heat and redistribute it evenly across the cooking surface. The intense and immediate heat from the preheated stone surface allows the dough to become crispy while maintaining a delightfully chewy texture.
     To replicate this at home, one could spend $2,000-13,000 and buy a proper wood burning pizza oven, il forno di pizza. A more popular route is to purchase a “baking stone” or “pizza stone”, a flat, rectangular or circular slab of ceramic designed for the home oven.
    Unfortunately, unless you purchase a topread more

00014

Jan 09, 2010

Unbelievable Modern Scrap Wood Table

Scrap Table

This 10'x30" table was constructed entirely from free, reclaimed lumber using a clever laminating technique that eliminates the need for a dozen pipe clamps. "There's a lot of wood out in the world free for the taking -- in dumpsters, back alleys, vacant lots, abandoned buildings, recycling yards, and architectural salvage centers.  Most wood, if free from rot, is just as strong, durable, and good to use as new wood, once you sand off the weathering." The rest of the materials came in at under… read more

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