Pixelated Push Pin Portraits

Artist Eric Daigh uses red, black, yellow, and blue push pins to create photo-realistic art portraits. His work really takes advantage of the “realistic far away/geometric up close” phenonomenon that happens with “pixelated” art. I love the variations in distortion that are visible in the above photo.

   From his artist statement,

Using push pins, the innocuous, adhesive, near-detritus of our everyday Eric creates the view from here. His work is that rare arial perspective of the faces we see everyday, the vistas of common personalities, the longview of the human. You can stand up close, squint into the vacu-formed industrial sheen of some common object but such a perspective only argues the atomic structure of his work. As we pull back one quotidian reference morphs into another, objects become portraits, the pedestrian becomes sublime. Molecules, pixels, cultivated fields all speak to his medium. He starts with a flat 5 color cadence, all just rhythmic loops, then relationships form, a singularity shifts into subtle congress and depth and tones appear. We step back further and slowly, as if through the portal of some remote ship we suddenly recognize. That’s us. That’s me. His grids are pictoral DNA, a seemingly simple sequence that when sounded in its complexity reveals the honesty of the unreapeatable person.

created at: 08/18/2011

It’s amazing how realistic they look from far away, no?

Eric Daugh 

via ArtStormer

Chris
I write for manmadediy.