03663

Apr 04, 2018

How to Make a Cocktail from a Tree

During spring time, pine, fir, and other evergreen trees grow by producing new tips at the end of each branch. The new growth is a lighter, vibrant green, and you can (and should!) eat it. The tips have a wonderful citrus-y, woodsy flavor that tastes awesome in all kinds of sautes, seafood, and roasted dishes. But the easiest way to preserve their flavor is steep them gently in a syrup, which will last in your fridge for weeks. 

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04280

Jun 24, 2016

Do This: How to Make Your Own Maple Syrup

Tapping A Maple Tree

There's nothing better than real maple syrup on that steaming stack of flapjacks. If you live in an area where the maple trees sway, then you can make your own. Take a look.  

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03380

Jan 13, 2016

Your Answer to Winter: Warm Up with this Rosemary Vanilla and Honey Coffee Syrup

Homemade Rosemary vanilla honey simple syrup

Rosemary is one my favorite cold-weather herbs. It really adds extra warmth to whatever you use it with. I love it in breads, soups, libations and even coffee! Here's a simple recipe with warming ingredients that is sure to brush off that winter chill in the air.    

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00199

May 04, 2010

How To: Two Ways for Making Super Easy Simple Syrup

created at: 05/03/2010

created at: 05/04/2010If you've ever made any sorta of beverage - a cocktail, iced tea or coffee, lemonade, etc - you've learned some basic science - sugar does NOT dissolve in cold liquid with a simple stir. It takes either 1) LOTS of agitation or 2) a warmer liquid. Sometimes, this is a good thing, as granular sugar is often a key ingredient to a drink that involves crushing or muddling, like a mint julep or a mojito. And sometimes, it's really annoying and inconvenient.

So, the beverage-world has long used a liquid sweetener known as "simple syrup" to incorporate sugar into drinks. It uses a basic "simple" ratio of 1 part sugar to 1 part water. Some approaches call for as much as 2:1 sugar to water, which increases efficiency, but I'd keep it 1:1, or at most 1.5:1. See, simple syrup provides not only sweetness to a drink, but also volume. AND, most cocktail recipes will presume a sugar level of 1:1, so it's best to stick with what the pros use.  

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