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Sep 14, 2018

7 Common Mistakes to Avoid Whenever You Use a Random-Orbit Sander

Random orbital sander mistakes - common errors and solutions

The random orbital sander is one of the first tools any maker or DIYer should own. In fact, I can't think of another powered tool that I use more, on nearly every project involving wood. The design is simple, and right there in the name - they move, in a random circular pattern, to sand wood.

A huge improvement over its predecessor, the pad or orbit sander, these guys use special shaped sandpaper disc to get your project smooth fast and with minimum swirl marks. Well, at least faster than sanding by hand, and with much less energy. But with great power comes great...opportunity to mess things up. These wondertools work, but there are

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04671

Jul 28, 2017

How to Make the Ultimate Sanding Block

When it comes to sanding, the rules are simple. When you're dealing with curves and soft edges, you can use the contours of your hand to back up the sandpaper and naturally mimic the shape. But when it comes to flat surface: never sand without a sanding block. This keeps the paper flat, which means your final project will also stay flat. 

I was in the bad habit of cutting a new one every time I went to finish a project, which sometimes meant I went against my best judgment and ignored the sanding block rule when working on flat panels and tabletops. (I know, I know.) So, I decided to spend an hour and whip up a block I'd be excited to

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Feb 13, 2015

ManMade Essential Toolbox: Why Every Man Should Own a Random Orbit Sander

Each week in 2015, ManMade is sharing our picks for the essential tools we think every creative guy and DIYer needs. We've selected useful, long-lasting tools to help you accomplish a variety of projects, solve problems, and live a hands on lifestyle that allows you to interact with and make the things you use every day. 

created at: 02/13/2015

It's always a big step when you move from the manual version of a technique to the powered option. The miter box becomes a compound miter saw, you reach for a pneumatic finish nailer instead of a hammer, the #2 Phillips screwdriver a Li-Ion impact driver. 

And while there's still a great deal of pleasure from using hand tools, certain hand saws, bench planes, and hand drills, sanding by hand doesn't even come close. It's monotonous, tedious, and time consuming. It's the least creative aspect of any project or repair ... the "paperwork" of DIYing.   

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