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Apr 24, 2013

Blow My Mindsday: April 24, 2013

Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web. 

A fun and informative flow chart that details the various ways that time travel works in film.    

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Oct 12, 2012

Scotch: A Pronunciation Guide with Brian Cox

created at: 10/12/2012

Whisky fan, consummate actor, and proud Scot Brian Cox shares a intro guide to pronouncing more than forty-five different Scotches. Though it's possible the liquor store owner might not know any better, a good bartender certainly will, and perhaps you'll get a few extra drops for pronouncing it correctly. Maybe.  

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May 23, 2012

The Most Common Comma Mistakes, and How to Avoid Them

I'm the sort of guy who likes to learn to do things well.  If I make a cut on the table saw, I want it to be the best cut. If I set out to create a tasty meal, I want to do my best knife work, get the crustiest sear and the perfect seasoning. You call it obsessive perfectionism, I call it trying my best. Same same.

And I write and edit for a living, so I wanna use the English language as best as possible. (Yes, I started that particularly vulnerable sentence with and and used the colloquialism wanna.) So, I tend to love the various grammar geek posts and misused words infographics about the blogosphere, especially when there's new stuff to learn.

And this, my friends, is an especially good one. If you know all these tricks to proper comma usage, particularly that trickster identifier-name syntax, you deserve

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May 16, 2012

25 Handy Words That Simply Don’t Exist In English

created at: 05/16/2012

By some estimates, there are around 170,000 words in current use in the English language. The latest, twenty-volume edition of the Oxford English Dictionary records 171,476 words in current use, with 47,156 outdated words, and countless techinal terms, neologisms, and common words borrowed from other languages.

And yet, there are still those ideas that you wanna express, and simply can't find the right term...cause it doesn't exist. In English, at least.

But other languages have all kinds of interesting concepts and vocab words for things you just need to descibe. These terms don't have an English equivalent, but after reading this list, you'll sure wish they did.    

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May 15, 2012

"Suspicious" Quotation Marks

created at: 05/15/2012

This one's for all the grammar and type nerds: you've seen it - on handmade banners, store signs, that one grandparent who always puts smart quotes around your name on your birthday card, as if they're not really wishing you the best this year, "Chris"

Unnecessary quotation marks. Or worse, suspicious quotation marks that

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Oct 04, 2011

Wanna Live Forever? Become a Noun (A Song/Video about Eponyms)

created at: 10/04/2011

On a recent episode of Morning Edition, NPR's Robert Krulwich, of RadioLab fame, paired up with his colleague, Adam Cole, to write a clever song about eponyms, the people who serve as namesakes for actual items, like General Burnsides (sideburns), Harold Bluetooth, or Amelia Bloomer.

The video is great - awesome Monty Python-esque animation, a catchy tune, and quite informative. Click play to watch it:  

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Jul 26, 2011

Infographic of the Day: 8 Commonly Misused Words

created at: 07/26/2011

I'll admit it. I'm a grammar nerd. Well, at least a syntax geek. I'll often go quite far out of the way to avoid ending a sentence in a preposition, am pretty careful with my whoms, and am often misunderstood due to fact that I keep my lays and lies straight.

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Jan 28, 2010

How To: Properly Use a Semicolon

How to use a semicolon, the most feared punctuation on earth.Remember everyone: A ManMade reader is punctuationally-attuned reader.

Tongue-in-cheek art site TheOatmeal wants to help you know the best times to use a semicolon, "the most feared punctuation on earth."  From connecting independent clauses to super-commas and high-fiving dinosaurs, this is one grammar lesson you'll never forget.

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