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Jul 02, 2014

The Science of Barbecue: Why Old School Methods Still Make the Best Meat

Truly amazing barbecue - the transformation of tough, chewy cuts into something tender and juicy and full of smoke flavor - is a true artform. And like all craft, it involves a healthy does of science and technique as well.

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May 02, 2014

Weekend Project: Make a Paper Airplane that Flies Forever

A little science-y paper craft project to give a shot this weekend (or to goof off at work on a Friday): a perpetually flying airplane.   

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Apr 25, 2014

How to Drink All Night Without Getting Drunk

 

Esquire's Aaron Goldfarb recently hung out with Jim Koch, the co-founder and chairman of the brewery behind Samuel Adams, and, unexpectedly, learned the brewmeister's trick for being able to taste and drink socially professionally without losing his composure.   

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Apr 08, 2014

The Wonders Within Your Head

There's a lot going on in your head right now.  Your head, my head, all human heads.

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Mar 12, 2014

DIY with a Purpose: To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick

I hate starting blog posts this way, but I'ma exercise my one or two a year: I freaking love this idea.    

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Jan 29, 2014

Blow My Mindsday: January 29, 2014

Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web.


"Sea is for Cookie"... The internet is amazing. 

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Jan 17, 2014

The Science Behind the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies Ever

This weekend is shaping up to be another cold and blustery, snow-filled couple of days. The kinda weekend where you never manage to actually put on shoes, cause there's no way you're going outside. The kind of weekend where you take on an indoor project with all kinds of immediate rewards...like perfecting the ultimate chocolate chip cookie.   

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Aug 12, 2013

The Subtle Mysteries of Dinosaur Sex

Look...I'm totally willing to admit that this has nothing to do with crafting...or men...or DIY stuff. But, it's one of the more fascinating things that's captured my attention in a long while, and I think you'll enjoy it too.

The question is: If dinosaurs ruled the earth for 130 million years, they had to reproduce. And since they have some of the least babymaking features, how, exactly, did they do it?    

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May 02, 2013

The World's Smallest Movie: A Stop-Motion Animation of Individual Atoms

Animation is nothing more than arranging relatively stable things, taking a picture, and then moving and doing it again, frame by frame. Some artists use pen and ink, some clay, some real world objects. This creative team of IBM researchers decided to use atoms. Atoms!? A. toms.   

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Mar 06, 2013

Blow My Mindsday: March 6, 2013

Each Wednesday, I post some of my favorite can't-miss links, images, and otherwise mindblowing goodies from across the web. 

Just the way I like it.

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Feb 16, 2013

Infographic: 21 Emotions For Which There Are No English Words

created at: 02/21/2013

You know when someone asks you what your thinking about, and you just can't find the term? Or, when you're asked how you feel about something, and you have to start it with a caveat or an "I don't know" before searching for the best approximation?

Chances are, there are words for those situation, they're just likely not in the English dictionary.   

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Jan 28, 2013

Is It Possible to Dry Age a Steak at Home? And Will It Taste Better?

If you've ever forked up the dinero for a great steak at a high-quality steakhouse, and noted how much better it tastes than the ones you whip up on your own backyard grill, you're probably right. And it's not cause they're all that much better at cooking it than you are. It's because they likely started with another piece of beef altogether: a dry-aged steak.   

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Nov 06, 2012

Dutch Scientists Create Concrete that Heals Itself with Built-in Bacteria

Concrete is amazing stuff, and fun to work with in your own art and DIY projects. But, if it suffers a crack, the surrounding material will begin to disintegrate.

So, a team of scientists in the Netherlands have a created a new mix that can regenerate itself with the help of handy nutrient-munching bacteria.

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Sep 27, 2012

Did Blowing Into Nintendo Cartridges Really Help?

created at: 09/27/2012

Whether by urban legend or repeatable data, anyone that grew up with a Nintendo Entertainment System was aware of the, "when the game won't load, you show blow into the catridge, and even the system," particularly on pesky games like the metallic cased "The Legend of Zelda." I'm even willing to bet that that characteristic soundbite of forced air rushing around a 4x1" plastic hollow would be instantly recognized by anyone born from 1975-90.

But...did it actually work?  

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Sep 20, 2012

What Happens If a Color-Changing Squid Listens to Old School Hip Hop?

created at: 09/20/2012

Many squids, octopuses, and other mollusks (as well as some fish, amphibians, and reptiles) have chromatophores, specialized cells containing pigmentsthat can change the color of the skin. These cells respond to electrical impulses from the muscles, which means they can also respond to specific frequencies in the audible spectrum, namely 100 hz, or the bass frequencies of musical instruments.

Which means...a squid's chromatophores will react and change color with the beat of some deep, grimey beats! To see it in action, check out this amazing video:

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Aug 22, 2012

What If Every Single Person on Earth Jumped at the Same Time?

created at: 08/22/2012

Michael Stevens of VSauce explores the idea of what might happen if every person on earth - all seven billion plus of us - jumped into the air at the same time.  

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Aug 08, 2012

A Lightbulb Version of Newton's Cradle

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Newton's cradle (otherwise known as that swinging, hanging ball thing that people put on their desks and kids play with at the novelty gift store at the mall) demonstrates Newton’s third law of motion - "when two bodies interact by exerting force on each other, these forces are equal in magnitude, but opposite in direction."    

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Jul 12, 2012

"Millefiori" by Fabian Oefner Mixes Watercolor with Magnetic Fluid

Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner creates these bold, eye-popping images by mixing water color and ferrofluid, then puts it in a magnetic field. 

created at: 07/12/2012

   

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Jul 10, 2012

Photos of the Fantastic Machine That Found the Higgs Boson Particle

As you've certainly heard, last week, scientists annouced the discovery of a subatomic particle that is "consistent with" the Higgs boson, which may show how massless subatomic particles can acquire mass.

Equally fascinating is this incredible machine, the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, a four billion dollar "machine" which consists of 17 mile tunnel, whose "synchrotron is designed to collide opposing particle beams of either protons at up to 7 teraelectronvolts (7 TeV or 1.12 microjoules) pernucleon, or lead nuclei at an energy of 574 TeV (92.0 µJ) per nucleus (2.76 TeV per nucleon-pair)." Duh.  

 

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Jul 06, 2012

Exploded Photography of Everyday Objects

Photographer Adam Voorhes has been experimenting with exploded photography, and the results are this amazing series of images of each element of the whole object separated out into its component parts.

   

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