Man Made DIY


04058

Jan 06, 2016

The Process: From Timber to Tide

created at: 05/28/2013

This process video was one of Vimeo's Staff Picks and it's easy to see why. The five minute short is full of gorgeous cinematography as UK native and traditional shipwright Ben Harris discusses his lifelong love of woodworking and shipbuilding, and the kinship one feels with their craft when one starts at the very beginning with the rawest of materials.

 I'm a big fan of quiet, contemplative, maker-oriented short films, and if that sounds up your alley, this is one you won't want to miss.      

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03880

Oct 01, 2015

On Building Boats: Three Unique Tales of DIY Watercraft

Some of you may know that I built a raft and traversed the Mississippi River a few years back, having no prior knowledge of boat building. Believe it or not, it was remarkably easy to do if you're willing to plan ahead and put in some good labor hours. Here are three bizarre stories of different DIY boats from True Almanac, each constructed for different purposes, such as the "disaster-proof" boat designed to survive a tsunami pictured above.   … read more

03816

Aug 18, 2015

DIY Inspiration: Make a Custom Stand Up Paddleboard

Clearwood PaddleboardAs summer gives us just a few more weeks of dependable warmth, I’ve been hitting the water as much as life will allow. But soon enough it will be much too cold for getting wet and so here’s a project to get on now so when spring comes back around, we’ll be ready to once again enjoy a day on the water.   … read more

03407

Jan 15, 2015

How to Build a Canoe in 72 Hours

This project began, as it were, with a "crazy idea" - the possibility of canoe travel without taking a canoe with you. Of building one upon arriving in a new place or country, paddling it, then leaving it there upon departure. 

And...?  It worked.    … read more

03373

Dec 23, 2014

Inspiring Read: Boat Building with Merchant and Makers

Building a BoatI've wanted to build a boat ever since I sunk my small dingy on the Trinity Lake as a kid. Once I have the space, I will fashion a sea-worthy vessel and take it out to brave the ocean, or at least a sizeable pond.   … read more

02663

Aug 27, 2013

Before and After: A Beat Up $50 Canoe Becomes Seaworthy Again

created at: 05/28/2013

Eric Singer of Schwood snagged a worn out, leaking fiberglass canoe for $50, and managed to salvage it to become a fully functional (and leak free) vessel with just a few basic supplies from the hardware store. 

After an initial smoothing of the problematic areas, … read more

02449

May 09, 2013

How To: Make a $2 Nautical Knotted Rope Bracelet

The sun is out, sleeves are getting short, and that means: it's time to update your look for the season.

We have created two easy DIY projects that will add a nautical touch to your wardrobe without breaking the bank or having to buy a boat. Learn how to make your own knotted bracelet and...come sail, um, away.… read more

01903

May 17, 2012

Tiny Boats Sailing on a Sea of Bedsheets

The work of Guatemalan photographer Luis Gonzalez Palma explores his mixed Latin and Mayan heritage. In his latest series, Ara Solis, he explores the relationship of colonialism and the draw towards exploration and adventure. "The photographer retains his center of attention on his cultural background through these figurative representations. It appears to be symbolic of the European migration to the west and settlement in the Americas with a dream.

   … read more

00623

Dec 03, 2010

How To: Make a Canoe from a Single Sheet of Plywood

In my neighborhood, we have an excellent urban bike trail that runs along the a fairly large river that divides my city in half. Often, while cycling, I'll see folks, mostly elderly men, pop out onto the trail with their large canoes and kayaks.

"How fun," I always think, but there's no liveries or rentable canoe places until you drive an hour or so out of the city. Of course, I wouldn't need to rent one if I could get my hands on a piece of softwood plywood and a saw.

Which I can.

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