00165

Apr 13, 2010

How To: Perfectly Grilled Shrimp

created at: 04/13/2010

The BEST thing about cooking shrimp (and other crustaceans) is they tell YOU when they're done. They'll curl and turn an opaque pink/orange throughout, like Mother Nature's own little temperature gauge, or God's built-in egg timer.

The WORST thing about cooking shrimp, especially on a high-heat surface like your backyard grill, is that you've got to pay attention to get them just right, as they can char and overcook VERY easily.

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00142

Mar 30, 2010

How To: Liquor Lollipops

These grown-up lollipops improves on one of my favorite Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory quotes "Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker." (I've since learned it comes from Ogden Nash's Reflections on Ice Breaking).

This recipe calls for absinthe - the "green fairy" long outlawed in the U.S. - but could be adapted to include most spirits, I imagine. The ingredients list (minus the absinthe) seems pretty reasonable:

* 1.0 cup Sugar * 0.3 cup Golden Syrup * 0.25 cup Cream Of Tartar * 5 shot of Absinthe * Stove * Wooden Spoon * Pan * Mould * Popsicle Sticks * Confectionery Thermometer * 0.5 cup Water

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00109

Mar 11, 2010

ManMade Video How-To: Make a Custom, No-Sew Tool Belt from Repurposed Fabric

created at: 03/10/2010

The most efficient way to get your creative work done quickly is to keep your tools and gear within an arms reach. And if YOU move around, then so do your arms, so the best soiutions keep your goodies ON your person...like a tool belt.

And if your project is framing a house, then a traditional Bob Vila-style tool belt will do just fine. But if your arsenal involves items other than a hammer and drill, its often tough to find the perfect place to put  your tools.

So, make that perfect place. A tool belt is only as useful as its ability to store the things YOU use on your projects. ManMade went to hang out with fabric master Amy D. to see if we could create a durable, customized tool belt on the cheap.  

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00104

Mar 05, 2010

How To: Make a Boy's Sweater Vest [from an Adult Sweater]

At ManMade, we feature crafts and projects for men of all kinds, including little, tiny, adorable men.

Dana from MADE came up with this boy's sweater vest tutorial, which repurposes an adult sweater and "[turns] your little man into the gentleman he was meant to be." 

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00099

Mar 03, 2010

How To: Create a Basic Work Table

No matter what your medium - art, illustration, sewing, knitting, soldering, voodoo doll making - you gotta have someplace to do it. Many of us work in basement, garages, offices, closets, kitchen tables, and from boxes in couches.

But, as I've advocated before, a designated workspace to store and organize your supplies, whatever they are, can help one be more productive and inspired.Basic Work Table

I'm really digging this design by Randofo, which was built, in his words, as a
"simple work table for my home studio so that I could have a surface upon which to work and document projects. I tried to keep the design as simple as possible as I only have a limited arsenal of power tools, a small vehicle for transporting materials and little patience for woodworking."

I especially like the white surface - which is great for documenting and taking step-by-step photos. I wonder if the effect could be recreated with a secondhand, white dry-erase board supported by 3/4" plywood.

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00095

Mar 01, 2010

How To: Recreate the Very Manly Home of Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong - the U.S. cyclist who has become a household name for his Tour de France performance and ubiquitous yellow bracelets - has retired into a Spanish colonial outside Austin, Texas. It's pretty gigantic, and contains all the elements of traditionally masculine decor - lots of wood, leather, and warm colors.

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00091

Feb 26, 2010

How To: Dress Like You Know What You're Doing

http://www.channelguidemagblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/madmensuit.jpg

Here's a different sort of "how to" for ManMade...instead of actually creating something, it's a more of a "what to aim for...:"

But a creative guy has every chance to be a sharply dressed guy, and this very thorough article from LifeHack.org offers some pretty helpful tips, like

  • Pants should almost touch the ground without your shoes on
  • Shirts with button-down collars are not dress shirts.
  • You need more than one pair of shoes, but not too much more.     

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00088

Feb 24, 2010

How To: Fold a Paper Pinhole Camera

PaperCamera.gif

In 1979, the Czechoslovakian magazine ABC mladých techniků a přírodovědců [An ABC of Young Technicians and Natural Scientists] published a cut-out paper camera known as the Dirkon - from dirk- the Czech word for pinhole, with -kon, from the Japanese photo masters Nikon.   

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00066

Feb 12, 2010

How To: Make Your Own Moleskine-Like Notebooks.

In the era of smart phones, tablet pcs, and very useful, well-designed computer-based to-do apps, there's still something quite organic and almost human about scraping a pencil across the fibers of a piece of paper. So, even the most wired-up creative set still keep a notebook around - for speed, accuracy, and sometimes, inspiration.

cereal-box-journal

The Moleskine has become the standard, due in large part to a clever marketing approach at the Barnes and Noble superchain, who entice would-be highbrow superstars to use the same notebook used by Picasso, Matisse, and Hemingway. But despite their beauty, Moleskines are ludicrously overpriced. And...we never buy what we can make.  

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00061

Feb 10, 2010

How To: Create a Dorodango, a Japanese Mud Sphere



Dorodango - 泥 (どろ doro) "mud" and だんご (dango) "rice dumpling" - is a traditional pasttime for many Japanese school children. Dirt is mixed with water, then slowly shaped into a perfect, shiny or textured sphere.  

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00059

Feb 09, 2010

Two Options for Quick and Easy Image Transfers

Sometimes, hand painted just isn't the look you're going for, and you long to add some machine printed accuracy to your latest project. Here's two easy ways to add printed images to canvas, plastic, glass, paper, and whatnot.

Materials:

  • Image from a magazine or book, or printed via laser printer or photocopier. (Inkjet printers will not work)
  • Warm water
  • Large bowl or pie plate
  • Credit card or bone folder
  • For Process #1: Clear packing tape
  • For Process #2: Acrylic Gel Medium (or gesso, paint, or anything which states "polymer acrylic medium")
  • Paintbrush (a sponge brush will cut down on brush marks)

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00057

Feb 09, 2010

How To: Snag Stuff with a Whip

"There are few tools that can break the sound barrier while fetching the TV remote. But throw a whip right and its tip can travel 900 mph (producing a sonic boom), then curl back to snare the object of your desire."

Why?

Why not, friends...why not?Illustration by Lab Partners   

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00055

Feb 08, 2010

ManMade Video How-To: Mount Your Laptop to your Exercise Equipment.

created at: 2010/02/07

In the last decade, many folks have stopped subscribing to cable television, magazines, and the newspaper. We've quit writing down recipes on index cards, sending most letters, using the telephone, and going to the local video store. Many no longer work in a traditional office, as they can do everything they need from home. Because now, you can simply send and recieve all of that information on your computer.

Which means, we spend ALOT of time in front of a computer. And that doesn't make us lazy, necessarily. In fact, it actually means we can be more productive - in concentrating our work and communication into a laptop, we can keep ourselves moving while we get our work done simply by connecting our computers to the average home exercise machine.  

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00048

Feb 03, 2010

How To: Make a Keychain Screwdriver for Tinkering on the Go

I mean it. At least once a week, I find myself out and about and in the need of a screwdriver. I keep a multitool in my on-the-go bag, but I simply never seem to have it when the need strikes.

I have a key that will fit in most flat-slots, but a good old #2 Phillips head has come to be a must. I looked around, and found these for $10.00, but they're out of stock everywhere, and cost $6.95 to ship, I thought I could come up with a cool DIY solution for much less.

created at: 2010/02/02

I started with the plan to simply attach a driver bit to my keys, but that failed for two reasons: one, there's not much torque available through spinning between my fingers; and two, these things are made of titanium, and after four broken drill bits, I realized there's no way I was going to get through one.

But, eventually, I came up with a solution that works quite well, and isn't much a burden to have in my pockets.  

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00047

Feb 02, 2010

How To: Mini Lightbulb Terrarium

I love any craft project that involves breaking stuff AND miniature things, so this tiny terrariums housed in a lightbulb are right up my alley.

Alligator

Julie Melton from TinyTerra shares her technique for creating these diminuitive biospheres on The Hipster Home. Apparently, once you're able to remove the filament from the lightbulb, it's pretty smooth sailing from there.   

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