04590

Mar 21, 2017

DIY Skills: How to Loosen a Stuck Bolt With A Blowtorch

We've all come across the stubborn bolt. You know the one. That bolt that needs come off, like, now, but for no visible reason, the nut won't turn. Turns out, there's a simple trick: add a bit heat and get it turning quick. Here's how I make it happen.

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Mar 21, 2017

How To: Make Super Simple Tree Branch Magnets

Last summer, in the midst of the August showers, a neighboring building lost a beautiful maple tree in a major thunderstorm. It was quickly disassembled by the electric company, presumably so it wouldn't fall onto the power lines. And there it sat. For weeks.

Then, a month or so later, I heard a loud grind out of my open windows (horray for open window weather!), and spied a big truck with a wood chipper in their yard.

"Surely," I thought, "they're just gonna grind up the small stuff and use the trunk for something." But, they just kept throwing in big, beautiful chunks of pure hardwood, turning it into mulch. I immediately rushed out and asked if I could have what hadn't been chopped.

The guy was very hesitant (apparently no one had ever proposed such a crazy thing), but allowed me to escape with an armful straight limbs and branches (sadly, no trunk segments) as long as I promised not to tell anyone. So, don't repeat that.

My branches have been seasoning and drying all fall and winter, and are now ready to be turned into all kinds of fun "bring the outdoors in" projects. First up, these playful tree branch magnets which cost a mere $1.00 and some glue to make, and can be whipped up in less than 30 minutes.  

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Mar 16, 2017

I've Been Drilling Pilot Holes Wrong My Entire Life. Here's How I Learned to Correct My Technique.

So, ever since I learned to use an electric drill, I've followed this rule: when joining two pieces of wood, you drill an appropriately sized pilot hole completely through the top, and down into the second. This guides the screw, and the two pieces are held together when the screw's threads grab the wood and lock everything into place. The pilot hole's size is determined by the inner diameter of the screw's body, minus the threads. Right?

Wrong.    

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04592

Mar 15, 2017

How to: Make a Minimalist Wood and Leather Key Holder

When Erin discovered Anne Steensgaard's CatchMe keyholder online, she became instantly obsessed. Functional, beautiful, and full of organic textures and charm. Unfortunately, the piece is only sold in Boila stores, which are all located in Denmark or Sweden. 

But, she knew she couldn't rest until she had some

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Mar 14, 2017

How to: Make a DIY Industrial Bar Cart for Under $40

Frustrated with unnecessarily high prices for unnecessarily flimsy discount store kitchen carts, Andrew decided to get creative and whipped up an industrial-styled bar cart.

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04587

Mar 09, 2017

Weekend Project: Make a DIY Mid-Century Inspired Desk and Wall Unit

So... I like this project. I really like it, and I'll tell you why. First, it's made entirely from off-the-shelf parts from the home center. Then, because the parts are readily available, the only tool you need to make the entire thing is a cordless drill, which is awesome. And lastly, the attention

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04582

Mar 09, 2017

5 Metalworking Youtube Channels Every DIYer Needs to Watch Right Now

There are some incredible and craftsmen out there willing to share their hard-won experience. Metalworking is a varied field, with everything from blacksmithing to more modern welding techniques. The maker in me really likes the idea of a forge and pounding metal into something amazing so these channels are intended to highlight some serious iron-working. So with that, here are five of the best metalworkers on YouTube you should be watching if you want to learn something new.   

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Mar 08, 2017

Why One of My Favorite DIY Workshop Tools Comes from the Makeup Aisle

Last weekend, I was hanging out with a friend in his garage, and he dropped the F-bomb. This is not typical for this friend, so while a little surprised, I was mostly intrigued. He'd made a mistake and installed something backwards, which, according to him, he does 60% of the time because it's impossible to tell which end is which. He says he's tried to identify it, but tape doesn't work, and a Sharpie marker wouldn't show up on the black surface. 

So I says to him,

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04583

Mar 07, 2017

How to: Make Your Own Journals + Notebooks from Scrap Materials

Did you know you can make your own sketch and shop journals with just the materials you have on your shelf? Now you can scrap those yellow pads for something a lot more classy.   

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04584

Mar 06, 2017

Step It Up: How to Actually Stay Committed to Your Fitness Goals

It's been a few months since you made your New Year's resolutions, and chances are you're starting to get tired of the fitness grind. It happens to all of us, so here are a few tips to push past the hump and stick with those fitness goals for the long term.  

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Mar 02, 2017

Mend Your Clothing the Japanese Way

Japanese Textile Mending

If you have a few wardrobe items that haven't seen the light of day due to some wear and tear. Take a look at the Japanese method of mending textiles, especially denim, with unique, stylized stitchery.

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Mar 02, 2017

David's Shop Upgrade on a Budget: How to Build Affordable Shop Cabinets

Laying Out the Cabinet PiecesIt's time to actually build something for the shop upgrade. First up, we take a look at how to build wall cabinets from scratch (sheet goods at least).

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04581

Mar 01, 2017

How to Install and Mount a Vise without Drilling Holes in Your Workbench

My first "workbench" was a simple table-style surface. 2x4 legs, 1/2" plywood top, held together with black drywall screws. I built it in my first apartment when I was twenty-two, with my first (and only) power tools: a circular saw and a drill. 

In the back left corner, I mounted a shiny, new, bright blue Irwin swiveling bench vise. It was awesome to have it there when I needed it - holding metal stock and angle iron for cutting, helping me bend rod and pipe, even keeping dowels and small wood parts in place while working on them. Unfortunately, these activities constituted a very small amount of the projects I was doing, and mostly, the vise just got in the way during the other 97% percent of tasks.

So, for the past few years, that vise has just been in a storage crate, and I get it out and try to hold it in place when I need it. Which, in case you can't guess, does not work. Ever. So, I wanted to come up with a solution that would allow me to install a machinist's style swiveling benchtop vise, without having to permanently install it, or drill holes in my benchtop and have to thread and tighten nuts and bolts every time I use it.    

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Feb 24, 2017

The Process: My First DIY Screen Print (and What You Should Do So You Don't Make the Same Mistakes)

 

A few weeks ago, I decided to try my hand at screen printing. It seemed like a simple, straightforward process: Get the supplies and make it happen. Well, I made it "happen" and ended up learning a bit along the way. Here's my process and the things to watch out for when starting out.

There are a number of simple kits out there with all the supplies you need to get started. While they all seem to be complete, you can get better materials by gathering it all yourself. Here's my list of everything you'll need for $50 - $100. 

Make the Screens:

The first step is making your screens. While I used scrap wood in my shop, I wish I

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Feb 24, 2017

How I Succumbed to the Soothing Repetition of Routine (and Why I'm Happy About It)

I used to hate when things were the same. I grew up in a family where everything was always changing. We never ate the same thing twice, we had no hallowed holiday traditions, no yearly vacation spot, no alarm clocks, no bedtimes, no church, no chore chart or laundry days. We did everything ad hoc, on the fly, winging it from sun up to sunset.

Sometimes, on a weekend morning, we'd leave the house, all of us together, with some vague destination in mind – maybe a museum or a park – and end up somewhere completely different (a cemetery or a different state). If we went out to dinner to celebrate a birthday, we usually chose the

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